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(2.26)

To see inside the right ventricle, we'll remove this part of its wall. The tricuspid valve is here, we'll look at it in a minute. The pulmonary valve is up here.

The anterior part of the right ventricle, the apex, extends out of sight down here, among these intersecting bands of muscle called trabeculae. This is part of the the interventricular septum: the left ventricle is on the other side of it.

Now let's take a look at the tricuspid valve and its appendages. The tricuspid valve is also called the right atrio-ventricular valve. It usually has three cusps, sometimes only two. Here there are three. They're known as the septal, anterior, and posterior cusps. The posterior cusp is partly out of sight.

These strands of tendon-like material attached near the edges of the valve cusps are the chordae tendineae. They arise from papillary muscles, which project from the wall of the ventricle. The papillary muscles and chordae tendineae prevent the cusps of the valve from prolapsing back into the atrium during systole

Here's the tricuspid valve, set in motion passively by an intermittent current of water. When pressure in the ventricle rises, the cusps of the valve close together, along quite an irregular line.

The inside of the right ventricle is made irregular not only by the tricuspid valve and its appendages, but also by these numerous bands of muscle, the trabeculae carnae. The trabeculae form a dense criss-cross pattern over much of the ventricular wall, especially here toward the apex.

To see the outflow pathway of the right ventricle we'll go to a different specimen. The tapering part of the right ventricle that leads up to the pulmonary valve is known as the infundibulum, and also as the conus. Unlike the rest of the right ventricle, its ...

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(2.26)

To see inside the right ventricle, we'll remove this part of its wall. The tricuspid valve is here, we'll look at it in a minute. The pulmonary valve is up here.

The anterior part of the right ventricle, the apex, extends out of sight down here, among these intersecting bands of muscle called trabeculae. This is part of the the interventricular septum: the left ventricle is on the other side of it.

Now let's take a look at the tricuspid valve and its appendages. The tricuspid valve is also called the right atrio-ventricular valve. It usually has three cusps, sometimes only two. Here there are three. They're known as the septal, anterior, and posterior cusps. The posterior cusp is partly out of sight.

These strands of tendon-like material attached near the edges of the valve cusps are the chordae tendineae. They arise from papillary muscles, which project from the wall of the ventricle. The papillary muscles and chordae tendineae prevent the cusps of the valve from prolapsing back into the atrium during systole

Here's the tricuspid valve, set in motion passively by an intermittent current of water. When pressure in the ventricle rises, the cusps of the valve close together, along quite an irregular line.

The inside of the right ventricle is made irregular not only by the tricuspid valve and its appendages, but also by these numerous bands of muscle, the trabeculae carnae. The trabeculae form a dense criss-cross pattern over much of the ventricular wall, especially here toward the apex.

To see the outflow pathway of the right ventricle we'll go to a different specimen. The tapering part of the right ventricle that leads up to the pulmonary valve is known as the infundibulum, and also as the conus. Unlike the rest of the right ventricle, its lining is smooth. We'll look at the pulmonary valve in a minute.

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